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printed matter ST.AUBY, TAMÁS

TAMÁS ST. AUBY, Subsist.ence Level St.andard Project 1984, 2013


TAMÁS ST.AUBY, SUBSIST.ENCE LEVEL ST.ANDARD Project 1984, 2013
2 prints on A4
website ExIndex

One of the most unknown-known artists in Hungary is Tamás St. Auby (ps. of Tamás Szentjóby, born in 1944) being a non-artist, poet and performer, both inside and outside of the arts. He founded IPUT / ‘International Parallel Union of Telecommunications’ in 1968. Its central idea: “The art is hokum. The history is hokum. Art is everything, what not allowed. Be not allowed!” He had to leave Hungry in 1975, and he could come back not earlier than in 1991.

When I met Tamás St. Auby for the first time in 2004, I was quite impressed by his for me scary shamanistic dominance in his social interaction. Yet his presence was deeply lived through. His attitude was not about art in the first place while he was an artist and teacher on an academy in Budapest. It was at once clear to me that I wanted to invite him for participating in ‘Freedom Borders’, a group exhibition with Hungarian artists in Galerie van Gelder, Amsterdam in 2004.

 

Part of installation in ‘Freedom Borders’ at Galerie van Gelder, 2004

Foto K. van Gelder, Amsterdam

TAMÁS ST. AUBY, Ballot-Disco, 2004
250 x 140 x 140 cm
wood, voting bills, pen, walk-man/sound, map, light, human skull, plastic curtain, cardboard box

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ANDERSEN, ERIC printed matter ST.AUBY, TAMÁS

ERIC ANDERSEN, ‘Great occupation, but very few plants’, 2013


ERIC ANDERSEN, ‘Great occupation, but very few plants’, 2013
2 prints on A4, added 2 prints about exhibition Tamás St. Auby
mail 15 May 2013 at 13:44 hours about announcement of Tamás St. Auby’s exhibition at Museum Ludwig, Budapest, Hungary

By mail Eric Andersen gave a comment on an announcement of Hungarian artist Tamás St. Auby’s call to occupy “Rosa Fluxemburg Platz” on behalf of his exhibition in Museum Ludwig in Budapest: ‘Great occupation, but very few plants’. The chosen font of the lettering in red is typical for Andersen and may be found on badges he made with various texts.

 

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