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multiples WEIWEI, AI

AI WEIWEI, Study of Perspective – Tiananmen, n.d. [2014]

AI WEIWEI, Study of Perspective – Tiananmen, n.d. [2014]
110 x 110 cm
silk scarf, original cover with punched hole
edition unknown
mint
published by Third Drawer Down, Fitzroy, Australia

On the back of the cover the work is described as “Study of Perspective – Tiananmen, 1995-2003”, although this product was not for sale on the Third Drawer Down’s website before 2014.

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multiples WEIWEI, AI

AI WEIWEI, Sunflower Seeds (detail), scarf, n.d. [2014]

AI WEIWEI, Sunflower Seeds (detail), n.d. [2013]
21,7 x 21,7 cm / 110 x 110 cm
silk scarf, original cover with punched hole
edition unknown
mint
published by Third Drawer Down, Fitzroy, Australia

On the back of the cover this work is described as “Sunflower Seeds (detail), 2010”, although it was not for sale on the Third Drawer Down’s website before 2013.

Categories
prints WEIWEI, AI

AI WEIWEI, Namelist 2008-2011, 2014

AIWeiwei2014Namelist600

AI WEIWEI, Namelist 2008-2011, 2014
size print 78,5 x 28 cm
offset on paper
edition 100
numbered, hand signed by the artist
published by Art Edition, Cologne, Germany (2014)
€ 5.420,- incl. registered mail, not framed / Margin scheme
very rare





 

Verso the print reads: ‘Names of the 2008 student-earthquake-victims researched by Ai Weiwei Studio, Courtesy of the artist’. At the lower part of the print a sequence of numbers is printed.

Ai Weiwei is well known for criticizing governmental behaviour of the People’s Republic of China, although he has no problems with giving the White House the finger. Having spent his younger years in New York in the 1980s, when conceptual and performance art were dominant and while Warhol was active, he has learnt how to combine his own life and art into a daring and often politically charged performance that helps to define how we should see China of today. Ai Weiwei has been harassed and jailed for his continually calls to account of the Chinese governmental attitude.

The print ‘Namelist’ (2008-2011) includes names of the more than 5,000 schoolchildren who died during the Sichuan earthquake of 2008 due to a disproportionate number of collapses of shoddy schoolhouse constructions. Chinese authorities systematically neglected the deaths and its causes. The disaster was twisted. Therefore Ai Weiwei began to straighten out the record. Bad construction had contributed to the disaster and officials were very keen to suppress evidence of corruption. The factual number of victims was difficult to find out, until Weiwei and his helpers made the count, name by name. The students are memorialized at various exhibition venues and moments like here in the edition “Namelist”.

During the time Ai Weiwei was being withheld by the Chinese government, a period in which he was unable to travel and his passport having been taken in, he placed a fresh bouquet in the basket of a bicycle outside his studio each morning. His #aiflowers Instagram up loads invited people everywhere to make flowers to remember the very young students lost in the 2008 Sichuan earthquake.

Ai Weiwei: “Once we find the names and numbers, I think a scientific study should be done to study how the schools collapsed and how the students died,” says Ai. “If anybody tries to hide it, it is a crime to the people and the nation. This time I don’t think anybody can let it go.”

AiWeiwei2014Namelist400

Categories
prints WEIWEI, AI

AI WEIWEI, Study of Perspective (Tiananmen), 2013

AI WEIWEI, Study of Perspective (Tiananmen) Scarf, 2013
silk scarf with hand-rolled edges
110 x 110 cm / 43 x 43 inches
published by Artware, New York, USA
p.o.r.

Categories
multiples WEIWEI, AI

AI WEIWEI, Maybe being powerful means to be fragile, 2013

 

AI WEIWEI, Maybe being powerful means to be fragile, 2013
skateboard
hand numbered, signed in print on deck
edition 150
published by TheSK8room.com                

This is part of a set of hand-numbered and signed skateboard decks by Chinese artist and dissident, Ai Weiwei. These carry recognisable images from his oeuvre, including porcelain crabs and sesame seeds, accompanied by one of Ai’s aphorisms, such as “The World is not changing if you don’t shoulder the burden of responsibility” and “There are no outdoor sports as graceful as throwing stones at a dictatorship in the world.”

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multiples WEIWEI, AI

AI WEIWEI, There are no outdoor sports …, 2013

 

AI WEIWEI, There are no outdoor sports as graceful as throwing stones at a dictatorship in the world, 2013
skateboard
hand numbered, signed in print on deck
edition 150
published by TheSK8room.com                  

This is part of a set of hand-numbered and signed skateboard decks by Chinese artist and dissident, Ai Weiwei. These carry recognisable images from his oeuvre, including porcelain crabs and sesame seeds, accompanied by one of Ai’s aphorisms, such as “The World is not changing if you don’t shoulder the burden of responsibility” and “There are no outdoor sports as graceful as throwing stones at a dictatorship in the world.”

Categories
multiples WEIWEI, AI

AI WEIWEI, Dropping a Han dynasty urn, 2013

AI WEIWEI, Dropping a Han dynasty urn, 2013
50 x 70 cm
linen tea towel, Weiwei-ism quote
published by Third Drawer Down, Indooroopilly, Australia
price in year of issue                        AU$ 40.- September 2013

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multiples WEIWEI, AI

AI WEIWEI, Sunflower Seeds, 2013 [small version]

AI WEIWEI, Sunflower Seeds, 2013 [small version]
40 x 40 cm
cotton handkerchief, hand rolled edges
published by Third Drawer Down, Indooroopilly, Australia

Sunflower Seeds; interview with Ai Wei Wei about the production of ceramic seeds for Tate Modern Turbine Hall in London.

Sunflower Seeds was an installation made up of ten million unique porcelain sunflower seeds. However realistic they may seem, these life-sized sunflower seed husks are in fact intricately hand-crafted in porcelain. Each seed has been individually sculpted and painted by specialists working in small-scale workshops in the Chinese city of Jingdezhen. Far from being industrially produced, they are the effort of sixteen hundred inhabitants with skilled hands. The seeds were displayed at Tate Modern Turbine Hall’s vast industrial space, the 100 million seeds formed a seemingly infinite landscape.

Categories
multiples WEIWEI, AI

AI WEIWEI, The world is not changing…, 2013

AI WEIWEI, The World is not changing if you don’t shoulder the burden of responsibility, 2013
skateboard
hand numbered, signed in print on deck
edition 150
published by TheSK8room.com                

This is part of a set of three, hand-numbered and signed in print skateboard decks by Ai Weiwei. In the works of Ai Weiwei, the story and political context is important, if not more relevant than the objects themselves. In the case of the depicted crabs on his skate board design he refers to a story about a dinner party Ai arranged in 2010 as a protest against a sudden bureaucratic decision to demolish his brand-new studio. In 2008 when the mayor of Jiading (a northern district of Shanghai) invited Ai to build a studio space that would provide a cultural center for the city. The government promised to provide all the proper permits and to support the studio’s construction. Soon after the building was completed in 2010, the same government pledged to demolish Ai’s newly built studio. In response, Ai invited friends and supporters via Twitter to gather in his studio’s courtyard for a feast of 10,000 river crabs standing for the false “harmony” and invitation the government offered. Ai was placed under house arrest and couldn’t attend the feast with the crabs, but it went on without him. In the beginning of 2011 the studio was razed.

Based on stories like the one above porcelain crabs and sesame seeds have become part of his oeuvre, accompanied by one of his aphorisms, such as “The World is not changing if you don’t shoulder the burden of responsibility” or “There are no outdoor sports as graceful as throwing stones at a dictatorship in the world.”

Categories
multiples WEIWEI, AI

AI WEIWEI, Sunflower Seeds, 2013 [large version]

AI WEI WEI, Sunflower Seeds, 2013 [large version]
40 x 40 cm
cotton handkerchief, hand rolled edges
published by Third Drawer Down, Indooroopilly, Australia
Sunflower Seeds; interview with Ai Wei Wei about the production of ceramic seeds for Tate Modern Turbine Hall in London.

Sunflower Seeds was an installation made up of ten million unique porcelain sunflower seeds. However realistic they may seem, these life-sized sunflower seed husks are in fact intricately hand-crafted in porcelain. Each seed has been individually sculpted and painted by specialists working in small-scale workshops in the Chinese city of Jingdezhen. Far from being industrially produced, they are the effort of sixteen hundred inhabitants with skilled hands. The seeds were displayed at Tate Modern Turbine Hall’s vast industrial space, the 100 million seeds formed a seemingly infinite landscape.